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A young teacher inherits the nastiest family curse--with no warning. Watch for upcoming news!

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My role: editor

My Novelette


Drooburt

Angel wrote and coded this Twine interactive fiction piece just for fans at Wintersday, a Guild Wars 2 (GW2) holiday. Poor Drooburt is having the adventure of his life and nothing is going right.

Click here to play!

Artwork by the mega-talented artist Tirzah Bauer.

Drooburt was originally conceived by a GW2 narrative designer, the one and only Peter Fries.

anotherdimensionad-300x400The stories in this anthology come from wicked minds. They’re designed as cautionary tales and have the classic horror styling of a Twilight Zone or Night Gallery episode. For the most part, we kept the gore to a minimum in favor of telling scary stories full of atmosphere and strong characterization.

Many talented people were involved in creating this book. It was a work of love for the Rod Serling tradition.

Who is Rod Serling, you ask? I direct you to Netflix where you can watch all the old episodes of The Twilight Zone. Rod Serling was considered one of the greatest television writers of his era, along with Horror’s beloved Richard Matheson, who also wrote for the show. In this anthology, you’ll also get non-fiction about Serling and his legacy. Every Horror aficionado should know Serling’s name and be familiar with his work.

Making a Baby on the Riviera

Illegal Lane Change Button 300 x 225

Chicago lawyer, Adele London, has worked hard to get where she is, but when her misogynist boss makes it clear she won’t be allowed to excel, she decides she needs a change. With the help of her best friend Karen, Adele considers her options, and only one solution keeps rising to the top: the radical one. It will require that Adele forego societal conventions and stretch into new territory. Once she commits, there’s no going back! The time has come for her to make an illegal lane change.

Genre: romance
Year written: 2014
Year first published: 2014

Where You Can Find It

Part three of five now available at:
Silkwords.com

The publisher, Silkwords, does something unique and interesting: choose-your-own-adventure romances. ILLEGAL LANE CHANGE is one of their Reader Vote stories. Silkwords will post the introduction along with several choices for where the story should go next. Readers then vote, and I fulfill the story according to their wishes. I’ll update here once the introduction has been published.

Join me for the blog tour as well, for which I’ll be writing a half-dozen interviews and guest blog posts about tantalizing topics. It takes place from December 8-15, and I’ll post the links here as they become available!

mordremAlong with Scott McGough, my fellow narrative designer at ArenaNet, I recently answered some questions from GuildMag, a leading Guild Wars 2 fansite.

We talked about Lord Faren, the evil Mordrem currently destroying Tyria, and the mysterious underworld of bandits.

Read it here!

Genre: Introduction / Editorial
Year written: 2013
Year first published: 2013

Where You Can Find It

Mistresses of the Macabre, print anthology, by Dark Moon Books, 2013.

Order it online.

History

The anthology’s editor, Lori Michelle, wrote and asked me to write the introduction for her anthology of short horror stories by women authors. This coincided with the publication of DEEP CUTS, my own anthology that honored women horror writers, so I was already fired up on this topic. The best part of writing this introduction was reading the stories in the book. They’re a well-chosen array of horror tales, many of which stuck with me long after I’d read them.

Excerpt from the Introduction I Wrote

Women have written horror for longer than it’s been a recognized genre, and we’ve lived with horror for as long as we’ve walked the Earth. Let me explain.

The obvious connection that women have with blood—menses—curses us all. So often, men are surprised—and horrified—to discover exactly what goes on between our legs on a regular basis: the shedding of linings, the gushes of blood, and the pain through which we suffer time and again, as predictably as the rising of the moon. We hide it so well, most of the time.

This monthly blood-letting has long been a mystery that has inspired fear, prejudice, and superstition. It has helped to solidify the line between men and women, and it has been used as an excuse for keeping women out of “men’s business.”

Richard Webster, speaking about historical superstitions in the Encyclopedia of Superstitions (Llewellyn Publications, 2008), says, “People looked at a menstruating woman with horror and awe, because although she lost blood, she continued to live. Menstruating women had to remain out of sight, as it was thought that they brought potential danger to the whole tribe. Even making eye contact with a menstruating woman was considered dangerous.”

But not all the damage was done by men. In proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine, 1915, Raymond Crawfurd wrote an article entitled “Of Superstitions concerning Menstruation.” In this article, he describes how British farmers’ wives believed that a “menstruous woman” could not be trusted with milk because once she had touched it, it could no longer be churned into butter. They clung to this belief, despite the evidence to the contrary.

Women have carried the mark of “uncleanliness” since before the Middle Ages. Judaism, Hinduism, and Islam have histories of labeling women as “unclean.” Leviticus 12 (Old Testament) warns that a woman who has just had a boy child remains “unclean” for seven days afterward (as she is during her customary impurity [menstrual cycle]). This state is contagious, thus explaining why boys aren’t circumcised until the eighth day. The boy child is infected with his mother’s impurity until then.

World Horror Con 2015

HWA-WCH2015-web-banner

I am already planning and saving for World Horror Con 2015. It’s the 25th anniversary of the convention, and one of my most memorable WHCs was in Atlanta in 1999. I can guess that it will be a bit magical to go back 16 years later. Will it really have been 16 years? OMG.